Thursday, September 14, 2017

There Should Be A Better Way, Part 4 of 4




There’s a much better way for the Cherokee Nation to deal with mixed race Cherokee who are not eligible for tribal membership than to stalk them and harass them and call them “wannabes,” like they did to me. What they did to me should be illegal.

This is the fourth and hopefully my last report on this topic. Please read the previous three before this one. http://vancehawkins.blogspot.com/2017/08/controversy-of-fake-indians.html,
http://vancehawkins.blogspot.com/2017/08/cherokee-gestapo.html, and

http://vancehawkins.blogspot.com/2017/08/dna-proof-of-ancesty.html .

Most Cherokee Nation people are far nicer that those I recently ran into. I remember someone who was a Cherokee genealogist I ran into about two and a half years ago who didn’t yell at me, did not call me “wannabe”, or “fake”, or “phoney”. Some who did NOT call me crazy or “off my meds”. The earlier experience was a much more pleasant experience. I hope the Cherokee Nation discovers the tactics these bad genealogists are using and makes them behave move civil.

When this recent bunch of bad “Cherokee Genealogists” bushwhacked me a month ago, they kept insulting me and one girl said; “I hope you don’t find any connection to the Cherokee – he’s [talking about me] a member of the “Echota Tribe of Alabama” to the rest of the group before they even started their search. As a person who understands scientific methodology, that one sentence guarantees a bias on their part. It guaranteed their results should be voided.

They started calling me names, before they had looked up anything. After 5 or 10 minutes of that I just got off the computer practically crying at all the insults I heard that came at me 100 miles an hour. I later found out they declared I was a “wannabe” – I was faking it! They said I was a phoney! I have no idea what they did or didn’t do. One person said I’d been to prison – NOT TRUE! An ancestor had been long, long ago, for a year and this person, Chris Whitmore, KNEW IT when he said that! He should be in jail for saying that!

1.      Conversation
It was only later that I remembered far more pleasant conversation I’d had 2 and a half years earlier with another more reasonable and a more responsible Cherokee genealogist. Had this group been a friendlier bunch I would have remembered it sooner.

[note: I conversed with “Cherokee Nation Genealogist”, referred to as “CNG” hereafter, via messenger, over two and a half years ago. I forwarded several photos as well, but see no need to repeat them here.]

05/02/2015 3:42pm

Vance --
howdy CNG, Well if you want to help me with genealogy, I can give you some material I suppose. Thanks. I can start with dad was A. O. Hawkins, 1915, b. farm near Manitou, Tillman Co., Ok-1992 d. Altus, Jackson County, Ok. His mother was Loney Richey, b. Lewiston, Denton Co., Tx 1883 per delayed birth certificate. [She] m. Noah Hawkins 1904 Loco, Pickens District, Chickasaw Nation,. d. near Manitou, Ok 1963) Her parents were Jeffrey Richey (b. Ark, 1851 d. 1926 Tillman Co., Ok) and Josephine Brown (b. Ark 1854, m. to Jeff 1872. d, Tillman Co., Ok 1932. Per great uncle [Oscar Richey] in Indian/Pioneer Papers, after they married [in 1872] they moved to IT near Fort Smith. Great Uncle said he didn't know if they lived in Sequoyah or Leflore Co, as he didn't know which side of the river they lived on. By 1880 they lived in Denton Co., Tx. By late 1880s moved to Chickasaw Nation. Photos are dad, dad (ww2 photo -- don't know why I saved them together) & grandma, country school, and 2 of grandma's brothers (Hoten and Otho Richey) enlarged from that school photo.
 . . .

Vance --
Lona Richey's mother was Josephine Brown. Josey's parents were David Brown and Harriet Guess/Gist. Have no photo of David, b. Al abt 1822 d. Ark May 1865. A tin-type of Harriet exists, though. Some census records say [Harriet was] b. Tn and some say Ala. She was b. abt 1817 or 8 and died 1886 Denton Co., Tx. They married 1841, Shelby Co., Tn (Memphis). Also showing tin-type of Harriet with her granddaughter my great aunt Etta, but we called her “[Ain’t] Ettie”. That baby was an elderly woman when I met her in the early 60s. I think she died in the late 60s. It was her family that preserved that old tin-type. Dad passed in 1992, and one by one so did all his brothers. I realized only a sister survived so I wrote her a letter and her reply is also enclosed. She's gone now, too.

CNG --

Is this him?
Otho C Hawkins
Birth abt 1911 in Tillman County, Oklahoma, US
2 Sources
Birth abt 1911
Tillman County, Oklahoma, USA
1 Source
Residence 1920
16 Jan Age: 9
Holton, Tillman County, Oklahoma, USA
1 Source
Residence 1930
11 Apr
Age: 19
Holton, Tillman County, Oklahoma, USA

Family Members
Parents
Noah Allen Hawkins 1875 – 
Lona Clementine Richey 1883 – 1963

Show siblings

Vance

YES! That's my family. They were always listed as White on census records. OC was dad's brother, Otho Cecil. AO stands for Alpha Omega Hawkins, called "Al" and "Alpha" [or commonly called “Alfie”] but he was said to have also been named after great uncles on both sides (the Richey and the Brown) named "Alfred". There was both an Alfred Richey and an Alfred Brown.

CNG --

ok

Vance -- 
I don't want to make claims and all -- those are family stories only -- and we are not documented as Indian -- AT ALL! I remember them saying they thought about signing up for Dawes, but got mad or upset or something, and they never signed up. David Brown's parents were John Brown and Mary (Polly) Black and can be found living on the Tennessee River near what is Decatur, Alabama, today.

Vance -- 
I hope I haven't said anything wrong. I don't make any claims -- just these are family stories and might be wrong.

CNG --
oh no … sorry i had to [personal]

CNG --
Have you seen this?
John Brown, (Cherokee) in the U.S. House of Representative Private Claims, Vol. 1
Record Image Index-only record
Name:  John Brown, (Cherokee)
Nature of Claim:         Compensation for improvement on lands relinquished
Congress:        23
Session:           1
Manner Brought:        Petition
Journal Page:   50
Referred to Committee:          Indian Affairs

Vance
No, I haven't seen that. Does it have something to do with the Reservation rolls? One of my biggest problems seems to be there were a lot of "John Browns". Which is which? Sorry to hear about [personal].

CNG --
this is the John Brown the records were connected to ........
John Brown
Birth 1795 in Unknown
Death 1855 in Walker County, Alabama, US
Birth 1795
Marriage to Mary Polly Black 1820, 23 Dec
Age: 25
Lawrence County, Alabama, USA
Alabama Marriage Collection, 1800-1969 
Residence 1840
Age: 45 
Death 1855
Age: 60
Walker County, Alabama, USA
Spouse
Mary Polly Black 1801 – 1885
Siblings
David B. Brown 1822 – 1865
Malinda Amanda Brown 1828 – 1880
Nehemiah Brown 1829 – 
Elizabeth A. Brown 1834 – 1922
Alfred L. Brown 1837 – 
Nancy Y. Brown 1840 –
Martha L. Brown 1843 – 
Orleny Brown 1845 – 1889
Cynthia Brown 1846 –

CNG -- 
John Brown in the U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907
Name:  John Brown
Issue Date:      16 Oct 1835
Acres:  80.01
Meridian: Huntsville
State:   Alabama
County: Winston
Township:       11-S
Range: 7-W
Section: 25
Accession Number:     AL1300__.148
Metes and Bounds:     No
Land Office:   Huntsville
Canceled: No
US Reservations:         No
Mineral Reservations: No
Authority: April 24, 1820: Sale-Cash Entry (3 Stat. 566)
Document Number:    6954

CNG
John Brown, (Cherokee) in the U.S. House of Representative Private Claims, Vol. 1
Record Image Index-only record
Name:  John Brown, (Cherokee)
Nature of Claim:         Compensation for improvement on lands relinquished
Congress:        21
Session:           1
Manner Brought:        Petition
Journal Page:   318
Referred to Committee:          Indian A

CNG -- 
John Brown Jr in the U.S., War of 1812 Service Records, 1812-1815
Record Image Index-only record
Name:  John Brown Jr
Company:        COL. MORGAN, JR.'S, REG'T CHEROKEE INDIANS.
Rank - Induction:        PRIVATE
Rank - Discharge:       PRIVATE
Roll Box:        27
CNG -- 
this is on David Brown
Prisoner Of War
David was listed on a roll of prisoners from Corinth, Mississippi at Provost Marshal's Office  October 14, 1862. He was at the battle of Shiloh, Pittsburg Landing Tennessee; the Battle of Iuka, Mississippi on 19 September 1862, the battle of Corinth on the 3rd & 4th; Hatchie on the 5th and 6th of October.

Vance
THAT IS MY JOHN BROWN!! How did you do that? My David was at the Battle of Corinth, but I didn't know he was also at Shilo. I thought he might have been because Corinth was fought shortly after. Where/how did you find these things! That Brown family moved to Arkansas and those same names are found in later Arkansas census records. Let me see and make sure I have this right. THOSE Browns are associated with a Cherokee named John Brown? You did that so easily! I've looked for 20 plus years!!

CNG --
Sometimes you have to search by last name with the dates to many times people use nick names or the names get confused down the line in searched for my grandmother as JJJJJ for 20 years just to fall over her real name LLLLL one day

Vance
THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!! I'VE GOT TO GET A COPY OF THAT!! I can't believe it! Sorry for the upper case. I'll definitely pay you something for a copy of that material on John Brown and his family, especially where it mentions his family. That information is priceless, to me, anyhow. You can name your price. 

CNG --
No. I charge nothing. Ssend me your e-mail address and i will put it in an e-mail

Vance
vhawkins1952@msn.com. Then CNG, I am in your debt. Again thank you.

CNG
it will be coming from [email address].

Vance –
Thanks -- I had really [almost] given up on ever discovering anything else.  I'll be looking for it.

CNG -- 
ok i sent this conversation you should be able to print it out

Vance -- 
I have it. Thanks. I need to get a copy of the original. I'll be taking off work for a week next month. I have a project to work on, now. 

CNG
lol. i hope it is your family that would be so exciting

Vance
I know they will be!

CNG
i also will keep snopping a little
do you have access to the cherokee rolls

Vance
Thanks. I have access to some of them. I got frustrated because I had no way of knowing which John Brown was which. There are several of them! But you mentioned his children's names, and they are the same names we have! It will still be difficult to know which of the Brown's on the rolls are our relatives, and which aren't.

CNG
there are 3 john Brows on the 1817 reservation rolls in arkansas
but it will take some researching by you to identify them or rule them out
i am going to share with you this site

Vance
Yeah, and I think mine went to Arkansas, and also returned to Alabama. I don't know how to rule one out or where to go, beyond the rolls.

CNG
http://cherokeeregistry.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=387&Itemid=582
Cherokee Rolls
Our mission is to preserve and document the history, culture and genealogy of the Cherokee people. We provide the tools and resources with which descendants can discover and preserve their family heritage, learn more about who they are, and join together with tribal members.
cherokeeregistry.com
you check family names and compare birth dates. Too many see a name on the rolls and think that is there family without really researching it
but john and polly are on the 1817 resevation roll look for your self

Vance
So I guess John Jr would be mine, then?

CNG -- 
they may all be yours they could all be family
but that polly and that John are cherokee
and you have the land agreement in our conversation

Vance --  
And that is where they lived. [we] first discovered [them] in Northern Lawrence County, Alabama records, but later records put them further south in Winston and or Walker Counties. And the children that are mentioned in Alabama in 1850 are the same children in Arkansas census records in 1860, and they are the same children in the records that you have shown me as belonging to this Cherokee Brown family. I have usually only seen the father's name with no idea how to discover the names of the children or sometimes the wife. This changes things..

CNG -- 
awesome
I am happy i could walk a little on your journey

Vance -- 
Well so am I, CNG. Shocked and awed!  I am in your debt.

CNG --  
all you owe me is a good thought now and then lol

Vance -- 
you got it!

CNG -- 
i am here almost every day so if you have any questions feel free do send me a message



Vance --

will do.



CNG --

now you can tell [name] your family is on the 1817 reservation rolls lol



Vance --

I suspected that roll, and also suspected that is why we weren't on later rolls. It is my understanding the people on the reservation rolls agreed to assimilate and left the Cherokee Nation.

well thanks again, will talk later



CNG --

The 1817 Cherokee Reservation Roll Results

A listing of those applying for a 640 acre tract in the East in lieu of removing to Arkansas. This was only good during their lifetime and then the property reverted back to the state.

This is only an index of applicants, in most instances the people listed here did not receive the reservation they requested. We will be posting the remaining documents surrounding the Reservation Roll including a list of actual recipients in the near future.



CNG --

yes talk to you any time

05/25/2015 9:52am



2.      Condensed Version of the Above Convesation

(CNG stands for Cherokee Nation Genealogist)

CNG --

have you seen this



John Brown, (Cherokee) in the U.S. House of Representative Private Claims, Vol. 1

Referred to Committee:          Indian Affairs



John Brown, (Cherokee) in the U.S. House of Representative Private Claims, Vol. 1

Record Image Index-only record

Report issue

Name:  John Brown, (Cherokee)

Nature of Claim:         Compensation for improvement on lands relinquished

Congress:        21

Session:           1

Manner Brought:        Petition

Journal Page:   318

Referred to Committee:          Indian A



CNG --

this is the John Brown the records were connected to ........

John Brown

Birth 1795 in Unknown

Death 1855 in Walker County, Alabama, USA

Birth

1795

[Location of birth:] Unknown

1 Source

Marriage to Mary Polly Black

23 Dec 1820

Age: 25

Lawrence County, Alabama, USA

Alabama Marriage Collection, 1800-1969 - Its repeated 3 Times for each.

2 Sources

Residence 1840, Age: 45

Lawrence, Alabama, United States

Death 1855

Age: 60

Walker County, Alabama, USA

Family Members

Spouse

Mary Polly Black; 1801 – 1885

Children

David B. Brown, 1822 – 1865

Malinda Amanda Brown, 1828 – 1880

Nehemiah Brown, 1829 –

Elizabeth A. Brown, 1834 – 1922

Alfred L. Brown, 1837 –

Nancy Y. Brown, 1840 –

Martha L. Brown, 1843 –

Orleny Brown, 1845 – 1889

Cynthia Brown, 1846 –

[Note: I wonder if the last two or three names listed might have been grandchildren.]



CNG --

John Brown Jr in the U.S., War of 1812 Service Records, 1812-1815

Record Image Index-only record

Add alternate information

Report issue

Name:  John Brown Jr

Company:        COL. MORGAN, JR.'S, REG'T CHEROKEE INDIANS.

Rank - Induction:        PRIVATE

Rank - Discharge:       PRIVATE

Roll Box:        27



1840 census

The 1840 census doesn’t give the names of the spouse of children, but it gives their age. We can compare them with the record above given to me by a Cherokee Nation Genealogist, and the 1850 census So here is the record of the 1850 census.



1850 Walker County, Alabama census (followed by ages per records CNG discovered)

Mary Brown 49 NC (49)

Linday Brown 25 Ala (22)

Elizabeth Brown 16 Ala (16)

Orleny Brown 15 Ala (5)

Alfred Brown 13 Ala (13)

Nancy Brown 10 Ala (10)

Martha Brown 8 Ala (7)

Syntha Brown 4 Ala (4)

Nancy Brown (inmate) 5 Ala

Levy Brown (inmate) 3 Ala

David Brown (inmate) 1/12 Ala



So the names and dates agree very well – TIS is the family mentioned by the Cherokee Nation genealogist as the children of a Cherokee named “John Brown Jr.” listed on the Reservation Rolls. On 1860 census we discover the youngest children and the children of Linday, aka Malinda (Brown) Johnson. “Syntha” is also spelled “Cynthia”.



1840 census

John Brown 1 0 1 2 0 0 1, 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 – or

Males

0 to 5 years old – Alfred Brown (3 years old in 1840 per 1850 census)

10-15 years old – Nehemiah Brown (11 years old per CNG record)

15-20 years old – David Brown and one unknown (18 years old in 1840 per 1850 census. By the time of 1850 census, David had married and was living in Lawrence County, Arkansas)

40-50 years old – father, John Brown (I think his birth was closer to 1790 but CNG had birth abt 1795.)

Females

5-10 years old – Orlena Brown (5 years old per 1850 census)

10-15 years old – Elizabeth Brown

20-30 years old – Malinda/Linday Brown (15 years old)

40-50 years old – Mary Brown (49 years Old)



Most of the children fit except. Two males between 15-20 years old in 1840 census are not on 1850 census. One was our David as he got married and moved to Arkansas. We don’t know anything about the other one, but he could have done the same and moved off. The 1840 census lists 2 females, one from 5-10 years old and a second from 10-15. There are 2 females in those ranges, but both are 5 years old. In those days it was far more common for children to die young, or for the parents to take in orphaned cousins or neighbors. Under those circumstances, I think we have a pretty good match. Per the records found by the Cherokee Nation Genealogist, Elizabeth WAS 11 years older than Orlena, making it agree with the 1840 census records. I suspect it must then be the 1850 census records that have her age wrong.



1860 census records

In 1847 both David Brown (John’s son and my g-g- grandpa) and John Brown are listed in Alabama tax records. In 1850 census John Brown is not with the family anymore and Mary is head of household in Alabama. In 1848 David Brown is on a tax list living in Lawrence County, Arkansas. In 1860 census Mary is also in Lawrence County, Arkansas.



Mary Brown 59,

Nancy J, 19

Martha L, 16

Malinda Johnson (Linday on 1850 census), 34

Nancy 13

Levi 12

David 10

Thomas 1



Cynthia is missing. She should have been 14, but isn’t on the 1860 census. We don’t know what became of her. But these are the names of MY family, born and living in the locations where my family is found. I constantly tell people names, dates and locations are the key – they HAVE to match. In this case they do.



Continuation of Two Year Old Conversation



After conversing with those Cherokee Gestapo lunatics, I contacted the same person who’d helped me about 2 years back, who is also a CDIB card carrying genealogist. I didn’t say a thing about who had just insulted me. But I did mention I’d just been insulted. Here is much of that conversation.



Vance

I found this group of people who talked about the "Echota Cherokee Tribe of Alabama" and I had just joined them after last talking to you. They started calling me "wannabe, fake, phoney", and so on. I asked why what they had against this Alabama group. . .  I went to post on a genealogical DNA group and one member of this group shouted out – “Vance is a fake Indian, a wannabe, and he's crazy. . .” and [they] went on and on . . .I am at a loss. Why are these folks lying about me? Just very confused.



Thu 5:01am



CNG

I am not sure Vance what group was it



Thu 8:36am

Vance

When I contacted them I was just hoping to find out what the Cherokee Nation had against state recognized groups, and I got more than I bargained for. I will continue to believe more Cherokee people are like you than them. Thank you for helping me find my Brown's. Best wishes.





CNG

the struggle is a tough one ...when the nations split ...meaning when some stayed behind and chose not to go on the trail of tears they gave up the right to call themselves Cherokee and became just a citizen of the united states ...some later in 1924 fought for their right to call themselves Cherokee therefor the Baker roll was compiled and became the North Carolina band....because the others gave up the Native American citizenship  they are not nor ever will be recognized as Cherokee , and the most they can be called descendants but still have no rights.



CNG

no it is not right, but it is Cherokee politics



CNG

now state tribes do not require proof of lineage and pretty much let anyone who believes in there heart they are native to join....mostly for a monthly or yearly fee and the five civilized tribes view them as culture thieves , the states don’t mind if they claim Native because it generates state grants and revenue.....there is money in having a token Indian tribe in your state



Vance


That group I joined -- called Echota Tribe of Alabama -- do charge $45 yearly. I wish those other people I asked the same question to had been more patient, and given me more time to think about it I didn't want to offend anyone. I understand [My Cherokee ancestors] left the Cherokee Nation when they started living in Lawrence Co., Alabama, and were living as US citizens rather than Cherokee citizens. I'm 64 -- will be 65 in December, and I am not quite as healthy as I was a few years ago. I just wanted a piece of paper I could hold up and say "I'm also Cherokee" or of partial Cherokee amcestry, too." I wanted to do that while I am still alive. That's why I joined that group. . . . They just didn't give me enough time to think it through before they jumped all over me, and I got defensive.



CNG

they are considered a fake tribe



Vance

 . . . Again, thanks for talking to me in a friendly manner and not accusing me of anything. . . .



CNG

i am always here if you need me



Vance

     . . . you are very kind . . . thanks.



Documentation



Here’s the 1850 census showing my Brown’s still in Alabama.
















And here are the remains of that same family in Arkansas in 1860, living in the same county as is my family, the descendants of John and Mary’s eldest son, David








Conclusion

Perhaps she does have a point. I do not know what criteria are used to determine citizenship in a state recognized tribe. I was accepted, but I am not sure which document turned the tide, and made my application acceptable. However there is NOTHING that makes the tactics they used against me acceptable. I spoke with a dozen others who said basically the same thing I say. They spoke in half-truths, told literal lies, and did everything in their power to.



I hope sincerely that they are exposed to telling lies about myself and others. I hope they change their tactics, and quit making up things about the people they investigate.

I hope a new breed of investigators will research people who have hard to find historical, genealogical, and genetic evidence supporting their claims of Cherokee ancestry. Those I ran into had no concern for facts. All they cared about was that I had recently joined a state recognized tribe, and that was enough for them to just try to make up lies about me.

But this present blog entry is also sign of hope. A Cherokee Nation genealogist found a link to my Cherokee past two years ago. There are others out there who are Cherokee who do better genealogy work than those I stumbled upon. Not everyone is out to make up lies about us. Others are sincere. It is my hope that the sincere people eventually win out over these others who are filled with hatred, who jump to conclusions prematurely, who have no business researching anything – they are way too biased for that.








Monday, August 21, 2017

DNA Proof of Ancesty, Part 3 of 4


DNA PROOF of Ancestry, Part Three

This is part three of four. Please read the first two, followed by this one, and lastly the forth. They all go together. The first two are found here --
http://vancehawkins.blogspot.com/2017/08/controversy-of-fake-indians.html and
http://vancehawkins.blogspot.com/2017/08/cherokee-gestapo.html

and here is the forth -- 
http://vancehawkins.blogspot.com/2017/09/there-should-be-better-way.html
Those people who interrogated me last week concerning my American Indian ancestry made a point of telling not only that my DNA results weren’t the “Proof” that they are, but that those results were not even “evidence” for it.
They are mistaken. I could have responded off the cuff, but it carries more weight if it comes from an expert in the field.
Each point of EVIDENCE I showed them that wasn’t PROOF, they considered it to also be NOT EVIDENCE, which was wrong – IT WAS EVIDENCE! Had they said it was evidence, just not proof, I would have agreed with them 100%! That is what I have always maintained. But DNA results do NOT lie – These results are proof! These people said not only was it not proof, it wasn’t even evidence! They showed we have American Indian DNA on every chromosome.

I searched the internet and found the following:
www.Gedmatch.com had this page, which had a link here:
https://www.gedmatch.com/DNA_for_Dummies.php
which in turn brought me here:
https://sites.google.com/site/wheatonsurname/beginners-guide-to-genetic-genealogy
whch led me to the page below. I prefer this page to others because it is written so that anyone reading can understand it.
https://sites.google.com/site/wheatonsurname/beginners-guide-to-genetic-genealogy/lesson-7-atdna-ancestral-origins-part-1

atDNA ancestral breakdowns are done via special SNPs called AIMs or Ancestral Indicative Markers. These AIMs are markers that have a great deal of variation and are indicative of a place of origin or group of people. A series of AIM SNPs gives us an indication where someone's genetic material flowed from for a particular segment of DNA. Ancestry and FTDNA also make use of AIMs (each with their own algorithms) so the results may be different from different companies. There are two more players which you should be aware of. The first is GEDMATCH which hosts various different tools for "painting" your chromosomes under the heading "Admixture" and then "Ad-Mix Utilities." The other are offerings from a company called DNA Tribes. Hopefully these will be covered in a future lesson.
The basic premise is the same no matter where you test. These tools attempt to give you a breakdown of your ancestral origins. There are some important limitations and caveats. First, it is necessary to understand that your paper family tree and your DNA are not identical. Huh? Let's see why not. Let's go back to our first lesson and the Visual DNA Chart. Look at our 8 great grandparents across the top. Let us for the sake of discussion have each of these grandparents have a different ancestral origin.

"Great grandpa Blue" (paternal)  = 100% Polish
"Great grandma Yellow" (paternal)  = 100% English Colonial
"Great grandpa Green" (paternal)  = 100% Irish
"Great grandma Pink" (paternal) = 50% Irish 50% English Colonial
"Great grandpa Gray" (maternal)  = 50% African 50% English Colonial
"Great grandma Orange" (maternal)  = 50% Norwegian 50% Swedish
"Great grandpa Light blue" (maternal)  = 50% Native American 50% Portuguese
"Great grandma Salmon" (maternal)  = 100% Chinese
The estimated amount of DNA of the great grandchildren would be about 12.5% from each great grandparent, so our estimate would look like this:

25% English Colonial
18.75% Irish
12.5% Polish
12.5% Chinese
6.25% each of African, Native American, Norwegian, Portuguese, and Swedish
However the DNA we inherit from each great grandparent is not equal and those great grandparents with more than one ancestry may give unequal shares of that ancestry to their children and then their children give more or less to their children and so forth. So in the DNA lottery you may have gotten 13% from your Chinese (salmon) great grandma but your half Native American and half Portuguese (lt blue) great grandpa may have only given you 12% of his DNA and not in equal portions so you may have only retained 3% of the Native American and the other 9% is Portuguese. This does not change who are great grandparents are. Our DNA only reflects what we win from each great grandparent in the DNA lottery. So in reality great grandchildren with the same parents might look like this:

Great grandchild “A”
28% English Colonial
22% Irish
11% Polish
10% Chinese
8% Norwegian
7% Swedish
6% African
4% Portuguese
4% Native American

Great grandchild “B”

24% English Colonial
20% Irish
11% Polish
12% Chinese
6% Norwegian
5% Swedish
8% African
5% Portuguese
1% Native American
Each of these great grandchildren has the same great grandparents but they did not inherit the same DNA. So given this example you can see that by the time great grandchild B passes their DNA to their children some may not reflect any discernible Native American. Another particular problem with Native American AIMs is that they have some of the same ancient origins as Far East DNA so sometimes a program is unable to know which is which and may report Native American as Asian or visa versa. Similar problems creep in with heavily admixed (mixed origin) countries or ethnicity.

In the beginning there were often only a few major categories represented by AIMs: European, Asian and African. As time goes on these categories get more specific: Northern European versus Southern European or North African versus Central Africa versus East Africa versus West Africa. In some cases algorithms have trouble discerning the difference between Scandinavian and British (such is the case with the current breakdowns at ANCESTRY). So all ancestral origins in their current state are estimates of your background based on your AIMs. Since these represent an even smaller subset of your total genome you need to use these as indicators rather than hard and fast percentages.
ANCESTRY
Ancestry now provides the most extensive ancestral breakdown in its new Genetic Ethnic Estimate. I suggest looking at the links under additional resources for a more thorough exploration. Each of the screenshots posted here can be clicked on for a larger view. The first page gives an overall view.
There are two more more Ancestral Origins tools. They are GEDMATCH's Admixture tool, and products from DNA Tribes geographical analysis. An excellent Blog post 2015 by TL Dixon on combining Admixture with Chromosome painting here . 

http://www.rootsandrecombinantdna.com/2015/05/ethnicity-chromosome-mapping.html

http://www.rootsandrecombinantdna.com/p/what-are-your-favorite-links-tools.html

After I shared this information from that website, a member of this group thought he needed to tell me how “blood quantum” worked. However this website was talking about DNA we inherit from out ancestors, which is not “blood quantum. He said (below);  “Vance, this is how BQ works. Great grandpa blue is full polish. Great grandma yellow is full English. They will produce Grandparent A who is 1/2 Polish and 1/2 English. Great grandpa green is full Irish and great grandma pink is 1/2 Irish and 1/2 English. They will produce Grandparent B who is 3/4 Irish and 1/4 English. These grandparents will produce parent A who is 1/4 Polish, 3/8 Irish and 3/8 English.
“Great grandpa gray is 1/2 African and 1/2 English. Great grandma Orange is 1/2 Norwegian and 1/2 Swedish. They will produce grand parent C who is 1/4 African, 1/4 English, 1/4 Norwegian, and 1/4 Swedish. Great Grandpa light Blue is 1/2 Native American and 1/2 Portuguese. Great grandma Salmon is full Chinese. They will produce grandparent D who is 1/4 Native American, 1/4 Portuguese, and 1/2 Chinese. These grandparents will produce parent B who would be 1/4 Chinese, 1/8 Native American, 1/8 Portuguese, 1/8 African, 1/8 English, 1/8 Norwegian, 1/8 Swedish.
“The children of parent A and Parent B will be 1/4 English, 1/8 Chinese, 3/16 Irish, 1/8 Polish, 1/16 Native American, 1/16 Portuguese, 1/16 African, 1/16 Norwegian, and 1/16 Swedish.

“With every person's DNA by a random amount of each parent's DNA and considering that a few of the countries you listed are also countries that also have the markers that are among those considered to be Native American, it is possible for a child of the parent to DNA test with greater than the Native American great grandparent. It is also for a possible for a child to test with no Native American DNA. It depends on the luck of the draw what DNA the people get.”

Here is my response. It is expected that percentage of DNA will vary from values based on “blood quantum" as you describe it. The two will vary at a predictable rate. Thus anyone expecting an exact DNA match, I. e. -- 25%, 12.5%, 3.125% et cetera – will be greatly disappointed. We obtain "about half" of our "X" chromosomal DNA from each parent. However in reality we might get 60% from one parent and 40% from the other. This will occur within the boundary of known parameters based on probability theory and the variance found in found in the data. This is a measure of the difference between experimental results, and the results one might expect. In theory, we expect 1/2, 1/4th, 1/8th, et cetera. But in practice, those values are only approximately reliable.

We don't always inherit the same percentage of DNA that we should from each ancestor. Females get 2 pairs of "x" chromosomes whereas males get 1 "x" and 1 "y". Males get the "y" chromosome and accompanying DNA exclusively from the father. For me, that leaves only the single "x" chromosome. And the same was true for my father. So I have 1/4th of the "x" chromosomes" of a female daughter of a female of the same generation. Through the "x" chromosome, we inherit approximately half of our genes from our mother and half from the father. So it would be rare that we would inherit EXACTLY 25% of our "x" chromosomes from a grandparent -- it will vary more than we might think from the expected value. 

Yes there are some DNA strands that are similar throughout all races and nations. But geneticists know which ones those are. They are not the ones used in these tests. American Indians share more with Siberians than with others, and this is made proven by these results. Every year these tests get better and better. With each passing year the genetic testing gets more accurate than the previous year, as more data pours in. By getting only 1 set of "x" chromosomes males variance should be > females on the average, but knowing the variance will compensate for that. differential.

About State Recognition

Here is how the state of Tennessee sees recognition:

STATE   OF   TENNESSEE OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL PO BOX 20207 NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37202
February 27, 2007
Opinion No. 07-21
State of Tennessee’s Authority to Recognize Indian Tribes
QUESTION
Does the State of Tennessee have authority to recognize Indian tribes, or is that authority solely held by the federal government?
OPINION
The State of Tennessee has authority to recognize Indian tribes.
ANALYSIS
In 2003, the Legislature reestablished the Tennessee Commission of Indian Affairs (Commission).  As part of its powers and duties, the Commission must “[e]stablish appropriate procedures to provide for legal recognition by the state of presently unrecognized tribes, nations, groups, communities or individuals, and to provide for official state recognition by the commission of such.”  Tenn. Code Ann. § 4-34-103(6) (2003).  In 2006, the Commission initiated rulemaking to establish Tennessee’s recognition criteria and procedure.  
The United States Constitution grants Congress the authority “[t]o regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes.”  U.S. Const. art. I, § 8, cl. 3.  This provision encompasses what is commonly known as the “Indian Commerce Clause.” While the United States Supreme Court has described Congress’ power under the Indian Commerce Clause as “plenary and exclusive,” United States v. Lara, 541 U.S. 193, 200, 202, 124 S.Ct. 1628, 158 L.Ed.2d 420 (2004); Washington v. Confederated Bands and Tribes of Yakima Nation, 439 U.S. 463, 470-1, 99 S.Ct. 740, 58 L.Ed.2d 740 (1978), the Court has also said that the States retain some limited authority over Indian commerce and Indian tribes.   See Seminole Tribe of Florida v. Florida, 517 U.S. 44, 62, 116 S.Ct. 1114, 134 L.Ed. 252 (1996).  As the Court explained in Seminole Tribe of Florida: 
[O]ur inquiry is limited to determining whether the Indian Commerce Clause, like the Interstate Commerce Clause, is a grant of authority to the Federal Government at the expense of the States. The answer to that question is obvious. If anything, the Indian Commerce Clause accomplishes a greater transfer of power from the States to the Federal Government than does the Interstate Commerce Clause. This is clear
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enough from the fact that the States still exercise some authority over interstate trade but have been divested of virtually all authority over Indian commerce and Indian tribes.   
Id. at 62 (emphasis added).  The federal government’s authority over Indian tribes is undeniably broad but it is not absolute or all-encompassing.  The federal government has not divested states of their power to recognize Indian tribes.
Congress has acknowledged that state governments have the authority to recognize Indian tribes.  Congress created a cause of action for the misrepresentation of goods as Indian produced and defined “Indian tribes” to include “any Indian group that has been formally recognized as an Indian tribe by a State legislature or by a State commission or similar organization legislatively vested with State tribal recognition authority”  25 U.S.C.A. § 305e(d) (2000).  Tennessee’s General Assembly provided the Commission with the authority to recognize tribes under Tenn. Code Ann. § 4-34103(6).  A tribe recognized by the State of Tennessee would be able to bring a lawsuit against a person for offering a good in a manner that falsely suggests it is Indian produced pursuant to 25 U.S.C.A. §305e (2000).
Federal regulations make benefits available to state-recognized tribes.  For example, the Department of Health and Human Services provides direct funding for Community Services Block Grants for “organized groups of Indians that the State in which they reside has determined are Indian tribes. An organized group of Indians is eligible for direct funding based on State recognition if the State has expressly determined that the group is an Indian tribe.”  45 C.F.R. § 96.44(b) (2006); see also 45 C.F.R. § 96.48(c) (2006) (Community Services Block Grants for low-income home energy assistance includes state-recognized tribes as eligible participants).  The Department of Health and Human Services also administers the Native American Programs that promote economic and social self-sufficiency for Native Americans and defines an “American Indian or Indian” as “ any individual who is a member or a descendant of a member of a North American tribe, band, Pueblo or other organized group of native people who are indigenous to the Continental United States, or who otherwise have a special relationship with the United States or a State through treaty, agreement, or some other form of recognition.”  45 C.F.R. § 1336.10 (2006).  
States have the authority to recognize Indian tribes as long as there is no conflict with federal laws.  There is no conflict between Tennessee’s recognition law and federal laws.  Currently, Tennessee laws do not provide any direct benefits to Indian tribes that are recognized by the State pursuant to Tenn. Code Ann. § 4-34-103(6).  They do provide benefits to Indian individuals by making them eligible to receive scholarships, grants, or any other benefits afforded to minorities from the University of Tennessee system, the board of regents system, or any Tennessee school system.  Tenn. Code Ann. § 4-34-201 (1994).  The statute defines “Native American” as “an individual recognized as Native American by a federally recognized tribe or a state.”  Id.  As discussed, supra, federal programs do provide benefits to Indian tribes recognized by states. 
The federal government does not have the sole right to recognize Indian tribes.  Congress has acknowledged that states have the power to recognize Indian tribes by extending benefits and
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rights to state-recognized tribes.  The State of Tennessee has the authority to recognize Indian tribes, so as long as there is no conflict with federal laws.  

ROBERT E. COOPER, JR. Attorney General and Reporter
MICHAEL E. MOORE Solicitor General
SOHNIA W. HONG Senior Counsel
Requested by:
Michael L. Kernell House of Representatives Suite 38, Legislative Plaza Nashville, TN 37243-0193

Something about Alabama's laws --
http://law.justia.com/codes/alabama/2015/title-41/chapter-9/article-26/

CONCLUSION

I so hated the need to write this! I KNOW many probably most – enrolled Cherokee realize so many people never signed up for Dawes. I post this only to make them know that there is a hate group out there. Had they limited themselves to hating on and lying about others -- who knows, I might have been foolish enough to have joined with them. Who knows, hmmm? There are a lot of fakes though. That is what makes it so hard for me to decide to support the State Recognized Tribes! But they DO fulfill a need for people whose tribe won't even acknowledge that they exist.